Honeybee Cloths - Sewing supplies for busy bees - free patterns - easy  to sew pre-cuts. Pretty cotton prints - fresh cut off the bolt, patterns & notions.

Sewing supplies for busy bees - free patterns - easy to sew pre-cuts - Pretty cotton prints - fresh cut off the bolt - patterns & notions.

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Sewing supplies for busy bees, easy to sew pre-cuts. Pretty cotton prints, fresh cut off the bolt, patterns & notions.
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By Dawn, Sep 16 2018 05:04PM



Spending time in the outdoors, among the little wonders of nature is lovely any time of year, but a fine autumn day, when the fruits are ripening, the leaves turning colour and the possums making themselves a cosy spot to overwinter, is especially sweet.



Prairie points give the hedgehog a 3D-effect, which is lovely to touch. While an applique pear or two, and quilted oak leaves and acorns provide food and shelter.


Sampler Block Eight measures 10 1/2” square before joining to other blocks.



To make the block you'll need:


Materials:


11” square Off-white or Low volume fabric (Moda Bella Solids 9900 200)

Fat Eighth (10"x 22") - Brown fine stripes (Caroline no. 18652 16 )

4” x 4” – Moda Bella Solids Taupe (MBS 9900 310 )

Small pieces of green fabrics (Caroline no. 18653-14, Caroline no. 18652-14, Caroline no.18654-15)


Green, dark grey, and taupe thread for applique, stems and hedgehogs face.


4” x 6“ wadding or padding (for the pears)


Optional: Stabiliser or lightweight interfacing



Equipment: Sewing machine; Iron and ironing board; rotary cutter, mat and ruler.


Notions: Clover water erasable pen (or similar), Small sharp scissors, Applique pins.

Spray starch, freezer paper, small fine brush (needed for the spray starch method of applique).


If you plan to Quilt As You Go*, you’ll need an 11” square of wadding, and Quilting thread e.g. Gutermann Sulky Cotton (30 weight). Depending on which QAYG method you’ll also need an 11” square of backing fabric.


(*For more information on the QAYG method, please see Quilt Construction notes)



So let’s begin:


Print out the Hedgehog and Pear template [1 page PDF] or


Print the full tutorial below including template [8 page PDF]

• Fuse the stabiliser or lightweight interfacing to the wrong side of the 11” square of off-white fabric.


• Draw a 10” square in the centre of the 11” square, into which the design fits.


• Use this window to position and the hedgehog outline, approx 2” inch from the right hand side, and 1” from the bottom of the square.


Optional: If using the Quilt as You Go method, you may want to layer the wadding at this point, and work the next few steps using a 2 layer quilt sandwich of top layer and wadding.



Prepare the prairie points


From the Brown stripy Fat Eighth Cut – (25) - 2” squares; and (7) - 1 5/8” squares (4 cm)


• Fold in half along the diagonal, press. Fold in half again along the diagonal.


• Position the smaller prairie points along the top edge of the hedgehog. If using a stripy print place stripes in the same direction, so they point outwards from the centre of the hedgehog.


• Slot one prairie point inside the opening of the next. (see pic)


• Line up the trough between the prairie points so you can just see the outline of the hedgehog. Hold in place with pins and tack along the lower edge.


Now you’re ready to machine sew the prairie points in place.




• Using blanket stitch, sew along the lower edge of the prairie points.


TIP: Fitting a Walking foot to the machine, makes it easier to sew through multiple layers of fabric.



• Working from the rear end of the hedgehog, position the next three prairie points, slotting them one inside the other. Place, so they overlap the previous points, and curve slightly.


TIP: Use an ironing board to pin and hold the points, while positioning the row of prairie points.

• Baste, then machine sew along the raw edge using blanket stitch to secure.


• Next slot four prairie points together, as before overlapping the previous row, curving slightly. Machine sew to secure.



Repeat for the remaining prairie points, positioning 3, 4 or 5 points in a row. Slowly building up the body of the hedgehog. Blanket stitch each row in place as you go. You may need to add a little hand-stitch here and there to hold in place.




Making the Snout


Now the body of the hedgehog has taken shape, it’s time to make the head and snout. In this tutorial the starch method of applique, using Freezer Paper and starch is used. This gives a firm crisp edge and well-defined shape that is already to applique to the hedgehog block. (Or use your preferred method of applique).


• Trace the snout onto the shiny side of freezer paper, cut out.

• Place Freezer paper template shiny side down on wrong side of fabric. Press using a hot iron till the Freezer paper sticks to the fabric.

• Cut out, leaving ¼” margin right the way round, cutting the tips off the pointy bits, and clipping curves every 1cm (½”)

• Using a small brush apply a little starch to the ¼” margin around the template.


• Turn the edges over the freezer paper template and press using an iron.

• Remove the paper template.




• Position the snout so it covers the raw edge of the prairie points.


Pin and sew snout in place.

• Draw an eye, nose and a smile, using a water erasable pen.

• Satin stitch the eye and nose in dark grey or black thread.

• Use back-stitch to sew the hedgehogs smile.


NB. It is possible to make the applique shapes without freezer paper using ordinary paper, place several pins in place to hold the paper in place, and take care when ironing to avoid the pins.



Pear applique


Using the pear and leaf templates, prepare the applique pieces for applique using your preferred method. The tutorial below shows the starch method of applique.


• For the block shown you’ll need 1 large and 1 small pear; and 2 pear leaves.


• Use the pear templates to cut wadding for each pear. Slip the wadding inside the starched and folded edge of the pears, ready for applique to the block.




• Position and pin the pears and leaves, inside the 10” design window. Sew in place using small close together slip-stitches.


• Using a water-erasable pen, draw stalks from each of the pears Machine stitch the stems.



Well done! Your block is now complete!



If you choose you can continue and Quilt your block as you go, follow steps below.


Quilting options - If using the Quilt As You Go (QAYG) method.

(For information on QAYG methods, please see Quilt Construction notes.)


• Layer your block, using an 11” square of cotton wadding, and an 11” square of backing fabric, if following the 3 layer sandwich method 2.


• For the 3 layer sandwich, also leave a small margin un-quilted inside the 10” design window, to make it easier to peel back the layers when joining blocks.


Secure the layers using safety pins. Transfer the oak leaf and acorns outlines onto your block, using your preferred method of marking, and quilt either by machine or hand.



Quilt around oak leaves and acorns.


In preparation for joining Sampler block to Irish Chain blocks, trim a sliver of each side of the Sampler square, till it measures 10.5” square, to match the other blocks.


Congratulations! Block 8 – “Prairie point Hedgehog” is complete!



We’d love to see the beautiful Sampler blocks you make, so please do post them on Instagram using the hashtag – #SweetestThingsSampler.


Till next time, enjoy the little wonders of nature


From our little hive to yours,


Happy sewing x X

Dawn - Honeybee Cloths














By Dawn, Oct 30 2016 05:11PM

Yellowing birch leaves in our corner of the world means autumn is truly here. Every year, I love seeing their return, the colours so pretty against the backdrop of the sky.



On bright, sunny days, they become golden....



From these little leaves grew the idea for the "Little leaves" mini-kit.


Each kit contains a sprinkling of 10 bondaweb backed leaves and a few cloudberry coloured berries.


Perfect for making mini-quilts, totes, trimming T-shirts and clothes, or making table-runners, like the one in our post. We can't wait to see how you use your "little leaves" - if you're sharing on social media, please use the hashtag #AutumnLeavesKit


From our little kit, we made a table runner to brighten up the dining table, teaming it up with some left-over strips, in low volume duck egg blue prints, and white on white - to represent the misty autumn skies :)

If you're making a table runner from your kit you will need:


• Light coloured cotton strips 2 ½” wide

• Little leaves mini-kit (found in the autumn section of the store)

• Lightweight Iron-on interfacing

• Insulating wadding (optional)

• Backing fabric

• Thread


The length and width of your runner can be as long or short as you need it to be, so amounts of backing, wadding, interfacing, and strips will vary depending on the size of your runner. If you're making a long table runner, and need more than one pack of 10 leaves, additional Autumn leaves Mini-kits are available in store for just £2.


Low volume prints - Lotta Jansdotter (Mormor); Sweetwater; Cotton & Steel
Low volume prints - Lotta Jansdotter (Mormor); Sweetwater; Cotton & Steel

To make the background:


• Sew 2 ½” wide strips of different length end to end, till you have at least 5 long strips measuring the length of your finished item, plus ½” allowance. Press seams open.


• Place the long strips alongside each other, sew together and press seams open.


• Apply the lightweight iron-on interfacing to the back of the block.




Applying the little leaves:


• Simply peel off the bondaweb backing and scatter the leaves on top of the block.


• Once the leaves are in position press for a few seconds using a hot iron.


Then over to the sewing machine....



• Stitch close to the edge of the leaves using either straight stitch or blanket stitch.




• Dark grey thread is used to stitch the centre vein on each leaf and twigs.






To complete the runner



• Simply place quilt top and backing right sides together.


• Sew ¼” from the edge, leaving a small gap through which to turn the runner right side out.


• Using thumb and forefingers, pinch the edges, shaping them to give a nice crisp edge, then press.


• Slip stitch the gap closed.


• Topstitch as close as possible to the edge.


Alternatively, if you prefer the runner can be padded, simply layer your top and bottom layer, right sides together, then insulating wadding. Sew around the edges and leave a slightly bigger gap through which to turn right side out. Quilt to complete.


Now your runners complete, time to pop the kettle on :)


Hope you enjoy the little wonders of autumn.


Happy sewing x X




























Thank you for popping by our little hive of sewing. Enjoy your visit :)

 

ps. Honeybee Cloths blog is moving over to WordPress, please pop over and follow us "From our little hive to yours" -

We very much look forward to seeing you there, and sewing a little happiness together, Dawn  xx                    

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